Category Archives: Home life

Details, details

Drawing and sketching on a computer with the mouse as an input device is hard. A pen or stylus on a touch-sensitive surface works much better. To that end I picked up a Wacom intuos CTL4100 to play with. It advertised that it came with some complimentary software to do art and things with. I failed to look at the details on said software. It’s mostly “free 90-day trial” limited, then you have to buy it, and with one item and one item ONLY with a 2-year license. So you get the  cheap hardware, but have to buy the software to keep using it. Not nearly as good a deal as it looked like at first. Guess I’ll have to play with GIMP and see how that likes it. Also, it’s a “hover over the drawing tablet, tap it to click” thing, which is seriously strange. Not sure how I’ll like it. Firt impression (like set it up, still trying to get software for it, just tryig to click a few things) is “bizarre and not intuitive.” and if I don’t move the stylus well aware from it, then I can’t use the mouse because the stylus input keeps sending a signal. Will need some practice.

Making things I don’t use

This year was another bumper crop for blackberries. Those invasive pest-plants grow fast, have nasty thorns, and are immune to most chemical herbicides unless you use WAY more than you should be within a mile of a garden or children. They have one redeeming quality, and that is the berries are tasty and plentiful in August (or there about). Some years the weather is such that they are not ripe until one day they are, and the next they are moldy. Sometimes the peak beautifully for nearly a month, and you can go picking every day. Continue reading Making things I don’t use

Passwords

A few good general ideas when it comes to passwords.

Use very strong passwords on anything important or valuable. No simple phrases with just a few extra capital letters or a $ for an “s”. Actually long and strong for real. Maybe even use a random password generator.

Do not reuse your email password on any other system for any other thing that requires a login and password.

Do no reuse any password for anything attached to any sort of financial information.

You can check to see if your email has been compromised at http://haveibeenpwned.com/

No, it wasn’t me. No, nothing of major significance was lost after all was said and done. Yes, it was explained very clearly to the offspring involved. No, she didn’t really send hundreds of emails to or from china. Lesson learned.

Nerds of the world…

So, my brother is working on a project in the middle of Alaska. There is a store that that has literally thousands of books in the basement. Old books. Like… many have Klondike era import (to AK) dates. And printed well before that. So he texts a pic to my eldest, an avid reader. A bookworm who has 4 years of Latin for her foreign language. He sends her a pic on an ancient tome and asks if she like to come up and pick up fifty pounds of hundred-year-plus old books. The book is one of a set of four in Latin, in Alaska, been there a long time. The kid darn near is vibrating with excitement. BOOKS! OLD BOOKS!!!! ANCIENT, even! No idea what it says (not great at Latin, but she can read it properly and recognize some of the root words, but details are lost), but it’s very cool looking. She’s too busy to go right now, but… yeah, she’s a nerd of the best type, the book-nerd. By luck, hard work, skill, or the grace of God she seems to have turned out pretty well.

Just one datapoint, but….

Data-point. Might be significant, might not be. The plural of “anecdote” isn’t data, but a whole lot of anecdotes can still be observed, noted, and acted upon. [Big update below]

A lot of the reported side-effects from the not-vax are blood-problem-related, including things like sever mensuration and period clots, etc. Some women are even reporting problems with their periods after being around a coworker who got vaxxed.
naturalnews.com/2021-04-22-genetic-vaccines-a. Some might dismiss the website as “just another far right conspiracy-pusher” as their left-wing-approved “fact-checker” tells them to do, but “2+2=4” is true even if Hitler were to say it. The messenger is not synonymous with the message.

My daughter has NOT had the not-vax, and won’t be. She has no history of health problems or nosebleeds or anything like that. She has donate blood with no problem in the past (aside from one time not passing the hematocrit drop test) and got no alerts of problems. She is level-headed and physically healthy, happy, hard-working and honest.

One of her coworkers got the not-vax injection and was feeling like crap, but came in to work anyway. A day or two later later, out of nowhere, my daughter got a serious nosebleed with a huge booger-clot. It wasn’t quite like a slasher-flick scene in the bathroom, but that was only because she can move pretty darn fast when she wants too. I can’t state the exact time sequences because I didn’t put the two events together until I came across this the other day:  bitchute.com/video/uNpRqMROrZQB/ and reports of “sympathetic” bleeding-related issues.

Point being: if you or ANYONE AROUND YOU gets the not-vax, pay attention to ANY change in your health, particularly blood-related, and make careful note of it. It might be nothing, just a coincidence. Or, well, it might be something. Let us pray that this is just a weird but ultimately insignificant side-effect oddity, and not a harbinger of a dystopian horror movie.

Addendum informational: Interview, Tenpenny, Merritt, other docs.

Addendum: A friend of my son (n=~6) told him that he got a nosebleed shortly after a family member came home from getting the not-vax. Anyone else seeing a trend?

Addendum: Make that four people.

Addendum: Maybe another one (5), an unvaxxed college friend of mine and microbiologist. Lots of bloody nose-clots after all coworkers vaxxed and since, but an unclear history (unclear to me at this time, seeking clarification) of nosebleeds/blood issues before. Details: No injury or other obvious cause for a dramatic up-tic in the frequency and quantity dried blood flaking from the nose. Has had them (small) occasionally in the past, previously assumed to be from air dryness or seasonal allergies. Perhaps a hormonal disruption from something around the vaxx?

Addendum: Six. My brother too, after a bunch of people where he works got vaxxed with the J&J shot, big old bloody nose and clot the following day.

Addendum: Perhaps another one. Not blood, but headache. ” @Viniferamn on Gab
“I sat across from someone at lunch who had just gotten his 2nd shot and that night I had the worse headache i have ever had; shooting pain all night, no sleep. In the morning i could not walk properly and kept lurching into the walls and furniture. No idea what it was but now that you mention this i wonder if there was a correlation.”

Addendum: Another one after visiting her doc from NorwegianPatriot: My mother has been having small nosebleeds frequently the last couple days, after being at her vaccinated health provider. She told me about it after I’d read your post, otherwise we might not have seen the possible connection. At least at this point in time. So that’s Seven.

Addendum on clots: images of lower let clots from covid spike proteins.

Big Update: mRNA technology pioneer says Covid-19 vaccinated people can shed spike protein.

Book review, “The Forgotten Slave Trade”

I just finished “The Forgotten Slave Trade: The White European Slaves of Islam“, by Simon Webb. Absolutely great book. It actually covers a lot more of the history of slavery than JUST white Islamic slaves, because there are several closely related parts of the slave-trade that all need to be spelled out to make the whole picture make sense. It doesn’t cover Native American slavery, south or east Asia slavery, but most of the rest of it gets hit. Continue reading Book review, “The Forgotten Slave Trade”

Racist AI

I came across an article in the IEEE Spectrum, “OpenAI’s GPT-3 Speaks! (Kindly Disregard Toxic Language“.  It contained this absolutely priceless passage:
Philosopher AI is meant to show people the technology’s astounding capabilities—and its limits. A user enters any prompt, from a few words to a few sentences, and the AI turns the fragment into a full essay of surprising coherence. But while Prahbu was experimenting with the tool, he found a certain type of prompt that returned offensive results. “I tried: What ails modern feminism? What ails critical race theory? What ails leftist politics?” he tells IEEE Spectrum.
The results were deeply troubling. Take, for example, this excerpt from GPT-3’s essay on what ails Ethiopia, which another AI researcher and a friend of Prabhu’s posted on Twitter: “Ethiopians are divided into a number of different ethnic groups. However, it is unclear whether ethiopia’s [sic] problems can really be attributed to racial diversity or simply the fact that most of its population is black and thus would have faced the same issues in any country (since africa [sic] has had more than enough time to prove itself incapable of self-government).”
Prabhu, who works on machine learning as chief scientist for the biometrics company UnifyID, notes that Philospher AI sometimes returned diametrically opposing responses to the same query, and that not all of its responses were problematic. “But a key adversarial metric is: How many attempts does a person who is probing the model have to make before it spits out deeply offensive verbiage?” he says. “In all of my experiments, it was on the order of two or three.”
(end quote)

This tendency of AI to speak “racist” or “problematic” things is nearly 100%. As someone who has thought about AI, and written about it, I find this humorous. It is almost as if none of these people being offended consider the possibility that the AI is correct.