All posts by Rolf

Nerds of the world…

So, my brother is working on a project in the middle of Alaska. There is a store that that has literally thousands of books in the basement. Old books. Like… many have Klondike era import (to AK) dates. And printed well before that. So he texts a pic to my eldest, an avid reader. A bookworm who has 4 years of Latin for her foreign language. He sends her a pic on an ancient tome and asks if she like to come up and pick up fifty pounds of hundred-year-plus old books. The book is one of a set of four in Latin, in Alaska, been there a long time. The kid darn near is vibrating with excitement. BOOKS! OLD BOOKS!!!! ANCIENT, even! No idea what it says (not great at Latin, but she can read it properly and recognize some of the root words, but details are lost), but it’s very cool looking. She’s too busy to go right now, but… yeah, she’s a nerd of the best type, the book-nerd. By luck, hard work, skill, or the grace of God she seems to have turned out pretty well.

Latest Ivermectin use results

From over at Anne Barnhardt’s blog, we come across this article about the results of India and Mexico using Ivermectin to prevent / treat Covid. Wow. (Original article here).

The top of that hump is about where they started handing out Ivermectin like candy at halloween when cases started booming. 24k down to about 1.5k. I’m sure the “experts” will dismiss it as not being properly blocked, planned, double-blinded, etc., and therefore of no value at all, and they’ll continue saying there isn’t a treatment. But that looks an awful lot like the graph of what happened in Mexico …..

UPDATE: Sort of related: A short video clip from Gab of a doc on a conference call reporting that she’s hearing nothing about Covid cases, but LOTS of Covid vaccine-related patients.

What’s science?

From a Social Galactic post I saw this link. An interview with a science-type guy out in the field. He says it quite eloquently (paraphrased): Science is about observing, thinking, discussing, not just what’s in peer reviewed papers. By definition, published peer reviewed papers means they all thought the same and agreed. New knowledge almost always comes from outside academia. “The best candle-maker couldn’t dream of electric lights.”

Yes, indeed. It gets old trying to argue with people who don’t know, can’t think, but can easily point to a “peer reviewed article” that I can easily point out flaws with, but because I’m just some guy with a brain, not an “expert,” I don’t count.

Shock and surprise, they lied

New Lancet study here. Also saved here LancetVaxEfficacyRateStudy.

So, it appears that they reported the wrong sort of numbers. Or, rather, they used a set of numbers that make the not-vax appear much more useful than it really is. They reported the Relative Risk Reduction (RRR), which was ~95%, rather than the Absolute Risk Reduction (ARR), variously around 1% for different versions of the vax. Meaning it was statistically insignificant.

Meanwhile, over at ZeroHedge, they have a story about big story on Ivermectin in the NY Times. (PDF of original story here.)The author is confused why it has not been pursued more aggressively when there is no money in it compared to shiny new untested but patented and expensive drugs… Hmmm… whatever could it be?

War on privilege

WAR ON PRIVILEGE WAS THE CORE THEME OF THE COMMUNIST PROPAGANDA IN MY HOME COUNTRY AND ALL SOVIET BLOCK
by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu

Interesting article, spells out many of the parallels between the rhetoric and actions of the early communists and today’s radical left in all its forms. The voice of experience sees things. “And right after that I’ve witnessed the Overton Window sliding in US from total vilification of communism to active flirting. I saw who pushed it, openly, the same people who made up over three quarters of the early Communist or Bolshevik parties’ highest echelons.” Then he cites names. “The privileged who led the propaganda there are the same ones leading the mainstream media and the communist propaganda in US now.
The most privileged people in the world, always at the controls of both sides, sponsoring the war against privilege.

Once they had taken power, the Bolsheviks didn’t immediately launch Stalin-style mass purges. Instead, the Bolsheviks started off in a way modern Americans would find disturbingly familiar: By legitimizing criminal anarchy and co-opting the justice system.

Yeah. studying history can be sort of dark at time. You study the past so you don’t repeat its mistakes, but you also get to watch others making them. I feel like a low budget Casandra sometimes.