Category Archives: History

Fear is the mind-killer

I have, and have read, Meerloo’s “Rape of the mind” which is one of the books this draws heavily on. Very good, if rather depressing. This is an excellent video, with some good sources, not very long, and interesting artwork. It’s clear what they are talking about, without explicitly saying it and getting banned by EweTube. at about te 15 minute mark, when they are talking about isolation and desperation and offing a way out, that’s where we are now.

I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.”

― Frank Herbert, Dune

Books on stuff

Sometimes you fall down a rabbit hole and find all kinds of stuff. Maybe it’s things you know a little bit about, and you find out there is more science behind it than you thought, maybe it is a totally new thing that makes you go “uhhhh.. huh?” So here is a list of books  and papers that I’ve come across recently that look at some part of the world in a totally different way than conventional wisdom, all put in one place just because reasons… Continue reading Books on stuff

War on privilege

WAR ON PRIVILEGE WAS THE CORE THEME OF THE COMMUNIST PROPAGANDA IN MY HOME COUNTRY AND ALL SOVIET BLOCK
by Silviu “Silview” Costinescu

Interesting article, spells out many of the parallels between the rhetoric and actions of the early communists and today’s radical left in all its forms. The voice of experience sees things. “And right after that I’ve witnessed the Overton Window sliding in US from total vilification of communism to active flirting. I saw who pushed it, openly, the same people who made up over three quarters of the early Communist or Bolshevik parties’ highest echelons.” Then he cites names. “The privileged who led the propaganda there are the same ones leading the mainstream media and the communist propaganda in US now.
The most privileged people in the world, always at the controls of both sides, sponsoring the war against privilege.

Once they had taken power, the Bolsheviks didn’t immediately launch Stalin-style mass purges. Instead, the Bolsheviks started off in a way modern Americans would find disturbingly familiar: By legitimizing criminal anarchy and co-opting the justice system.

Yeah. studying history can be sort of dark at time. You study the past so you don’t repeat its mistakes, but you also get to watch others making them. I feel like a low budget Casandra sometimes.

Old History

Might sound redundant, but it is not. A “History Book” is one that attempts to expound the events and possibly explain the connections and “whys” between them, so that the reader has a better understand of what has happened in the past and how we got here. Sometimes our understanding of past events changes when new information comes to light. This is generally a good thing, though sometimes more (but still incomplete) information confuses things from the initial simple or largely speculative view.

However, there are also people trying to rewrite history and make the ‘wrong” things go away, and constantly invent or “reinterpret” things in order to push a particular narrative. This is NOT good. It is something the SJW and Marxists do a lot.

so it is expected that what history books say will, to some degree, change over time. But the whole-sale revisions going on now are all the wrong type. So I think it might be good for people to make it a goal to accumulate or copy or locate or translate or make availible older history texts to that it is not lost. For example I came across one the other day – US History – in a used book store printed in 1904. That means there were still a considerable number of Civil War survivors around to point out flaws. Any bets I discover something in it that is not popular in today’s books?

Real alternate history

This interview with James Lafond is fascinating.

He has written a LOT of books, and his summary of the historical non-fiction series “Plantation America” and what order they might be best read in looks useful. He expects to wrap them up with a summary and consolidation with a comprehensive narrative of the practice of white servitude / slavery / bondage in the colonies and early USA.

I’ve completed “The Greatest Lie Ever Sold: The Foundation of Our Misbegotten Nation“, and found it fascinating. Technically there are some errors (e.g., a two-page repeated passage about twenty pages apart and typos), and the style is kind of rambling, but it’s a fast and easy read with a lot of good sources cited. He does seem to have a passion for using primary sources, and a distain for secondary sources, which is nice. Well worth reading. Part of it ties in well with another book I read recently, “The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World” by Virginia Postrel. In both they use and learn from runaway slave reward posters and advertisements. LaFond learns about the races and how language was used, Postrel learns about fashion and clothing because it was often described as being part of the stolen property the runaways took.