Category Archives: Research

Fear is the mind-killer

I have, and have read, Meerloo’s “Rape of the mind” which is one of the books this draws heavily on. Very good, if rather depressing. This is an excellent video, with some good sources, not very long, and interesting artwork. It’s clear what they are talking about, without explicitly saying it and getting banned by EweTube. at about te 15 minute mark, when they are talking about isolation and desperation and offing a way out, that’s where we are now.

I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.”

― Frank Herbert, Dune

Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis

The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis is about the connection between language and thought.

The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis takes two forms: that language determines thought or that language influences thought. The former is a much stronger view because it states that one is incapable of understanding a concept for which the language has no name (it also implies that there is no thought without language). There is no empirical evidence supporting the strong version and considerable evidence that thought can proceed without benefit of language. However, the weak version plausibly suggests that different languages can “carve up” the world into different ways — or, put another way, that conceptual thinking can be shaped and constrained by available linguistic categories. As Whorf put it, “We cut nature up, organize it into concepts, ascribe significance as we do, largely because we are parties to an agreement to organize it in this way – an agreement that holds throughout our speech community and is codified in the patterns of our language”.

This is why controlling language is one of the first things tyrants and those who would control and manipulate other do. Co-opt and corrupt the language, and you can control the thoughts of the people more easily.

Books on stuff

Sometimes you fall down a rabbit hole and find all kinds of stuff. Maybe it’s things you know a little bit about, and you find out there is more science behind it than you thought, maybe it is a totally new thing that makes you go “uhhhh.. huh?” So here is a list of books  and papers that I’ve come across recently that look at some part of the world in a totally different way than conventional wisdom, all put in one place just because reasons… Continue reading Books on stuff

Interview with DR. Judy Mikovits

She has a pretty impressive resume. The Powers That Be have tried to destroy her, discredit her, etc. She’s got a lot of background into on vaccinations and disease in general, things that lead us to where we are today with the Wuhan Flu. Here’s an interview, and then a list of books that may have to add to my ever-growing reading list.

https://www.brighteon.com/5d01be97-d377-4abf-aed5-20abcfb0b24f Continue reading Interview with DR. Judy Mikovits

Old History

Might sound redundant, but it is not. A “History Book” is one that attempts to expound the events and possibly explain the connections and “whys” between them, so that the reader has a better understand of what has happened in the past and how we got here. Sometimes our understanding of past events changes when new information comes to light. This is generally a good thing, though sometimes more (but still incomplete) information confuses things from the initial simple or largely speculative view.

However, there are also people trying to rewrite history and make the ‘wrong” things go away, and constantly invent or “reinterpret” things in order to push a particular narrative. This is NOT good. It is something the SJW and Marxists do a lot.

so it is expected that what history books say will, to some degree, change over time. But the whole-sale revisions going on now are all the wrong type. So I think it might be good for people to make it a goal to accumulate or copy or locate or translate or make availible older history texts to that it is not lost. For example I came across one the other day – US History – in a used book store printed in 1904. That means there were still a considerable number of Civil War survivors around to point out flaws. Any bets I discover something in it that is not popular in today’s books?

QOTD- James LaFond

“Plantation American of the 1600’s was almost exclusively white-over-white slave-system.
The 1700’s was a time of very mixed-race slavery, roughly 60% white, 30% black and 10% Indian or mixed race in terms of total bondage rations across the original 13 states

From The Greatest Lie Ever Sold: The Foundation of Our Misbegotten Nation by James LaFond, from the chapter titled “Boys and girls”, where he shows a bit of the etymology of the terms and their use in America and why they are perceived so differently by black and white men.

I knew from a quote in “White Cargo” that in 1775 George Washington posted a runaway slave notice that only described three of the ten runaways as black, but I didn’t think it likely that was a typical ratio. LaFond goes on to say it wasn’t until the 1800’s that slavery gradually morphed into an almost exclusively black institution.

The book is oddly organized, more like a lightly edited set of research notes, emails, blog posts and snippets, but he’s got some interesting sources quoted. Not as many specific sources cited for specific claims as a more formal history book might, but this is something like book 9 out of a planned 13. I’m thinking some if some grad student wants a good research thesis, documenting just how many slaves/indentures were shipped to North America in the 1600’s and 1700’s by decade, and what their survival / runaway / actually able to claim their headright acreage numbers and rates were, it might be very eye-opening and would have a good-sized audience.

 

Common figures

What do Captain John Smith (of Jamestown fame, to most Americans) and Miguel de Cervantes (author of Don Quixote) have in common?

       

They were both military bad-asses (Smith- fighting as a mercenary against the Turks, won 3 individual combats leaving his opponent’s head’s on pikes, look at his coat of arms; Cervantes fought with notable bravery at Lepanto). They were both doing important things in the first decade of the 1600’s. They were both white guys (English and Spanish, respectively). They both had amazing lives worth reading a biography about. And they were both Christians who were held as Muslim slaves, Smith by the Ottomans in what’s now Turkey, Cervantes by the Barbary pirates looking for galley-slaves out of Algiers. Smith killed his owner and escaped across a considerable distance to friendly Christian territory, Cervantes had four unsuccessful escape attempts and was finally ransomed after fives years a slave.