Power of the laugh track

Pointed to it from Vox Day’s blog, I just finished listening to Owen Benjamin’s description (show number 494) of the sit-com Seinfeld and how the laugh track destroyed out culture. Pretty deep  stuff. But is it over the top? One thing that it brought to mind was how the Japanese military conditioned their soldiers.

It’s not a normal act to stick a blade into someone and be OK with it. So they’d tie up a prisoner (POW or civilian, made no difference to them), perhaps put them in a trench where they could not run away or retreat, and order a soldier to bayonet the victim to death. While he did that, his squad-mates would be standing around him, cheering him on,l laughing, clapping, making a joke or game of it. they’d already done the same, or soon would be. It conditioned them to think it was normal, and fun, and it dehumanized the victim. But it was the cheering, laughing, and open mocking of the dead and dying while their mate butchered a man… or woman, or child.

It was murder with a laugh track, and it was undeniably successful at its intended mission.

Yes, what Owen says is spot on. Not over the top. It’s psychos conditioning a whole generation. No wonder there are so many people today who need a shrink. Or, better yet, to purge their lives of screens.

Stolen idea

Sometimes when someone “steals” your idea, it’s not all bad. Plagiarism is the sincerest form of flattery, etc. In that light, via an email from a very helpful reader, I hear of Steve Bannon – yes, the famous one – supporting something like my idea from Heretics.

A “gladiator school” of sorts. Not identical, of course, and the CBS writers get some of the normal things wrong that they always do when describing anything remotely right of left-wing, but some good ideas, too.

h/t to Portly Pirate

Quote of the Day

A comment from Lyle (of UltiMAK) to a post by Joe, when explaining why leftist pols and mouthpieces say what they say, and do what they do, at times:

When authoritarianism’s pathology becomes news, liberty is to blame, and the solution is more authoritarianism.

 

Happy New year

Do something new and different.

Do something you’ve been putting off, but will feel better once you have done it.

Make the new year worth remembering.

For myself, I just did a little bit of bullet casting for the first time. Turned out all right, once I got a heat source that worked right.

Audio

Sorry for no updates in a while. Many things going on in life right now.

In story-related news, Heretics of St Possenti is now out in audiobook format!

In related news, Paul sent me an email with the following:

Miguel had an interesting article: https://gunfreezone.net/index.php/2018/06/19/horsesht-concern-trolling/

It links to an American Psychological Association paper http://www.apa.org/pubs/highlights/spotlight/issue-97.aspx. The abstract includes this:

“A final problematic assumption is that avoiding trauma reminders is healthy. The opposite is true. Avoidance behaviors make PTSD worse, and effective treatments include safe exposure to thoughts and feelings related to the trauma.”

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now all I need is a real job with a support-a-family-sized paycheck, and for my mom to get well enough to get out of the hospital (relatively minor stroke, now in rehab with a pacemaker; doing well, all considered).

Trump, guns, Parkland, Pavlov, and character(s)

In the real world, people tend to be true to their nature. Good writing reflects that, and characters act in ways that are internally consistent and believable. You may or may not like the characters, but if the various players in the story each are true to their own worldview, education, upbringing, etc., they are believable. In much the same way, various actors on the world stage – politicians, bureaucratic organizations, lawyers, televangelists, etc. – all play sadly repetitious, if not completely predictable, parts. Continue reading Trump, guns, Parkland, Pavlov, and character(s)